Difference between revisions of "Pronoun"

From The Jolly Contrarian
Jump to navigation Jump to search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
Lawyers don’t like pronouns because they (pronouns, that is, not lawyers) tend to be shorter and more idiomatic than repeated use of the nouns to which they (the pronouns, not the {{tag|noun}}s) might, if they were used, relate.
+
{{pe}}{{g}}Lawyers don’t like pronouns because they (pronouns, that is, not lawyers) tend to be shorter and more idiomatic than repeated use of the [[noun]]s to which they (the [[pronoun]]s, not the {{tag|noun}}s) might, if they were used, relate.
  
The official excuse has probably something to do with imprecision: “you” and “it” can ambiguously refer to the {{tag|subject}} or {{tag|object}} of a sentence: unlike those ultra-precise Germans, we Englanders only half-heartedly [[declension|decline]] our [[pronoun]]s. For all that, the Engish language — complete with pronouns — works unambiguously well in most other linguistic contexts. Besides, Lawyers have their own special form of {{tag|pronoun}} - the {{tag|definition}}.
+
The official excuse has probably something to do with imprecision: “you” and “it” can ambiguously refer to the {{tag|subject}} or {{tag|object}} of a sentence: unlike those ultra-precise Germans, we Englanders only half-heartedly [[declension|decline]] our [[pronoun]]s. For all that, the English language — complete with [[pronoun]]s — works unambiguously well in most other linguistic contexts. Besides, lawyers have their own special form of {{tag|pronoun}}: the {{tag|definition}}.
 
 
{{plainenglish}}
 

Latest revision as of 06:59, 18 July 2019

Towards more picturesque speechTM

George Orwell on plain English | SEC guidance on plain English Plain English Anatomy Noun | Verb | Adjective | Adverb | Preposition | Conjunction | Latin | Germany | Flannel | Legal triplicate | Nominalisation | Murder your darlings

The Jolly Contrarian’s Glossary

The snippy guide to financial services lingo.™
For the full index, click here

Lawyers don’t like pronouns because they (pronouns, that is, not lawyers) tend to be shorter and more idiomatic than repeated use of the nouns to which they (the pronouns, not the nouns) might, if they were used, relate.

The official excuse has probably something to do with imprecision: “you” and “it” can ambiguously refer to the subject or object of a sentence: unlike those ultra-precise Germans, we Englanders only half-heartedly decline our pronouns. For all that, the English language — complete with pronouns — works unambiguously well in most other linguistic contexts. Besides, lawyers have their own special form of pronoun: the definition.