Repurchase transaction

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ISDA Anatomy

incorporating our exclusive ISDA in a Nutshell™

Template:Nettingisda
Repurchase transaction. A transaction in which one party agrees to sell securities to the other party and such party has the right to repurchase those securities (or in some cases equivalent securities) from such other party at a future date.[1]
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Resources Wikitext | Nutshell wikitext | 1992 ISDA wikitext | 2002 vs 1992 Showdown | 2006 ISDA Definitions | 2008 ISDA | JC’s ISDA code project
Navigation Preamble | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14
Events of Default: 5(a)(i) Failure to Pay or Deliver5(a)(ii) Breach of Agreement5(a)(iii) Credit Support Default5(a)(iv) Misrepresentation5(a)(v) Default Under Specified Transaction5(a)(vi) Cross Default5(a)(vii) Bankruptcy5(a)(viii) Merger without Assumption
Termination Events: 5(b)(i) Illegality5(b)(ii) Force Majeure Event5(b)(iii) Tax Event5(b)(iv) Tax Event Upon Merger5(b)(v) Credit Event Upon Merger5(b)(vi) Additional Termination Event

Index — Click ᐅ to expand:

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Interestingly, a repo is one of the qualifying ISDA transaction types and could be effected under an ISDA Master Agreement and would qualify as a legitimate netting transaction, even though, of course one normally effects repo transactions under a Global Master Repurchase Agreement.

See also

References

  1. We assume, for this purpose that under the repurchase transaction, the original seller’s right to repurchase securities is limited to fungible securities and that it has no right to repurchase the exact same securities that it originally sold. This assumption is consistent with market practice, as far as we are aware, in relation to securities repurchase transactions governed by English law, and is necessary to avoid a risk that the transaction might otherwise be characterised by an English court as a secured loan.